Can carbon dating work on stone

Carbon-14 is a method used for young (less than 50,000 year old) sedimentary rocks.

This method relies on the uptake of a naturally occurring radioactive isotope of carbon, carbon-14 by all living things.

A commonly used radiometric dating technique relies on the breakdown of potassium (Ar in an igneous rock can tell us the amount of time that has passed since the rock crystallized.

If an igneous or other rock is metamorphosed, its radiometric clock is reset, and potassium-argon measurements can be used to tell the number of years that has passed since metamorphism.

The same may be true for igneous rocks, but finding suitable carbon samples may be unlikely.

Other signs, such as erosion may provide clues to the age of weather-exposed rocks.

Since the 1950s, geologists have used radioactive elements as natural "clocks" for determining numerical ages of certain types of rocks. "Forms" means the moment an igneous rock solidifies from magma, a sedimentary rock layer is deposited, or a rock heated by metamorphism cools off.

How do you think we estimate the age of earth, moon, prehistoric pottery and tools, etc?

Under I mean the period since a stone was carved into a historical artifact and I'm interested in periods that are accurate up to a historic age, like Antiquity or the Renaissance - I suppose one cannot ask for more, unless there are visual marks on the artifact, which provide clues?

PS I hesitated much whether my question is Chemistry- or Physics- related and decided to post it here, since it's purely practical. SE ;) , then the age of surrounding items may be a guide.

When living things die, they stop taking in carbon-14, and the radioactive clock is "set"!

Any dead material incorporated with sedimentary deposits is a possible candidate for carbon-14 dating.

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